Saturday, October 23, 2010

Restoration

Our lives can sometimes feel like a frayed patchwork...



Coming apart at the seams...






Tattered and worn on the edges,



like this beautiful quilt I found in a yard sale pile. I loved the vintage fabrics used in the 9 patch pattern, and the red backing, and knew it could be beautiful and warm, even though it would never be the same quilt that it once was. Some experts say that you shouldn't add fabrics to antique quilts, but instead, cover the frayed parts with fine mesh, to keep it together without changing it's original content. (This would especially be done to one with special historical value and not as worn as this one.)  My objective was to strengthen the quilt and restore its usefulness, even though that meant changing it.




Being the collector that I am, I usually have bits and pieces of vintage fabrics stashed around my sewing room.  I cut them to the size of the frayed squares (with enough added to fold under the edges) and just appliqued them over the worn out areas, and then re-quilted the new squares.


I also bought a piece of red fabric to make a new edge. I don't mind that it doesn't match exactly or look like it once did, the integrity and strength are what matter in quilts and lives. The changes that ultimately keep us together only add to our beauty and character.

2 comments:

Jan said...

On "Restoration", a lovely, inspiring entry. Worn and tattered quilts and lives, restored, strengthened, and made useful by the artist's wisdom and capable hands. Thank you, KT. ~Jan M.

Meadowlark said...

I have the quilt my grandma used in the nursing home, which was then handed down to my son and dubbed "cold blankie"... I've been hesitant to do anything to repair it, but this may be the shove I need.